Prometheus review : Great Buildup Fell Into A Plunge

prometheus-01

The beginning of the end.

Prometheus is the prequel to the alien franchise, directed by the one who launched the original Alien (1979). Prometheus is the perfect example of a film that was a big letdown after a massive setting and buildup. Plus, the film introduces complicated characters and the characters we are supposed to care about but don’t end up caring for the same. Like when Vickers (Charlize Theron) dramatically calls Weyland (Guy Pearce) “father!”, we will be like “I don’t care. what’s with that tone?”. Plus, there are a lot of unanswered questions from the film.

The film follows the crew of the Prometheus, who are on a mission to discover and interact with the “engineers”, creators of the human race. They found the engineers and at the same time, we get to experience the tradition of the Alien franchise, deaths plus survivors trying to find resolution (who might end up dead in the next Alien film).

Major questions raised are; who are the engineers? How did they put humans on Earth? The answer is kind of shown at the beginning. What is that black goo thing? Why did David (Michael Fassbender) infect Charlie’s (Logan Marshall Green) drink (the answer is given in Alien: covenant). Why did the engineers hate humans? What are their intentions?

The story and the buildup are amazing, we get to see Ridley Scott’s signature in that sense but after that, we get one bustle after the other and might even consider leaving the theater. The biggest drawback of the film is casting of Noomi Rapace in the lead role. Rapace is a very good actress and I loved her layered portrayal in the girl with the dragon tattoo series (Swedish) version. She did a commendable job in this film but lacks the charisma needed for scientist torn between what she is facing and doing what is right. The scene where she persuades Janek (Idris Elba) to take down the Alien space ship lacks soul and she lacks the look of a scientist and is more of a bubbly college student. Same is the case with Logan Marshall-Green but he is taken out of the equation quicker than expected. As per the information is given in IMDB, Charlize is supposed to play Shaw but due to the scheduling conflicts she lost the role to Rapace and is given the role of Vickers. Vickers is the kind of person that is meant to be despised then both Scott and Charlize helped in making it that way. Vickers did the iconic “running in a straight line” scene which will continue to make people laugh. Idris Elba is the saving grace. I wish he had more to do than just to stare at the monitors. He made little moments look impressive and are unreadable in many ways. He is handsome and charming at once, and Vickers herself couldn’t help but invite him in her room. About the character David, Fassbender just played himself with a stern and straight face. David is shown as the antagonist though the intentions behind his actions are shady and it makes David scary.

The visual effects, cinematography, and music deserve all the credit which helped in the anticipatory process. If you liked the film and if find it engaging then most of the credit goes to the technical side. The opening sequences are just like a picture or perfect photo portrait. And the ship sequences looks real and we are in the environment. Elizabeth’s character and the finding she makes makes this a feminist film, though the same soul is absent in the sequel.

Prometheus is worth a look. You may or may not like it. You might find some plotlines confusing. Why would Charlie feel like a loser despite finding what they were looking for? How come neither Weyland nor his assistants look concerned when Shaw entered their room covered in blood half naked?

That’s what this film did literally. Spilled out one question after the other. Being a science fiction film, there is scope for scientific analysis including human psychology, otherwise, it’s all flat.

2.5/5

Featured image: dread central

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s