300: Rise of an Empire review

 

300 2

“For glory’s sake , for vengeance’s sake…. war”

That’s it right? If you have grudge against someone, you start a war that includes death of thousands sometimes millions of innocent soldiers. Don’t forget Troy or Mahabharat. And still Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro) the one who’s looking forward to avenge his father couldn’t have it straight; for as Themistocles (Sullivan Stapleton) is brilliant in tricks and manipulations. Xerxes (handsome young man turned nerve-racking god king) wouldn’t be able to achieve all his godly powers without his apprentice and his father’s naval commander Artemisia (Eva Green) who herself have a small history that led to her malevolence against the Greeks. Artemisia leads her army to defeat the Greeks. She was impressed with Themistocles’s battling and commanding skills, so therefore she offers him to join her army which he denies in spite of every little pleasure she offered, including sex. This infuriates her and she retaliates with her army; something he feared but it was more brutal than expected. This leads to Themistocles with one choice, that is to unite Greece and fight back.

300: rise of an empire is any day better than the first movie because this movie have extra depth and an interesting backstory. “Rise of an empire” is actually prequel, parallel and sequel to 300. In between, we see shot of King Leonidas (to get a roar of applause from the fan boys) and another shot of him & the 300 soldiers dead (much to their dismay)

Why was this movie named “300”even though it involved over 10,000 soldiers? Anyway, as a sequel trying to be loyal it’s preceding version, this movie didn’t turn it’s back on any of the traditions like:

  • Hard-core violence
  • Blood shed in slow motion, that may give people with haemophobia a very tough time.
  • The yellowish tint.
  • Spartan’s ego.

 

screencraveSource screencrave

Sullivan Stapleton wass not good enough to fill Gerard Butler’s shoes. After all, the nothing could beat the latter’s “this is SPARTAAA”. The only person who makes this film worth watching is Eva Green’s astounding performance as Artemisia. The only awkward thing was, her flawless British accent for someone born in Greece and brought up in Persia.  In spite of being a bloodthirsty villain who keeps demanding victory, some how she draws in respect. She is shown as a survivor of rape and slavery who was eventually abandoned to die by the Greeks. Eventually, she was taken in by Persians who trained her to fight hard and seek revenge. Then you will see her as a poised yet nefarious commander of a large fleet that carries built men who dare not give her a look of defiance. Lena Headey’s is more like Sarah Connor in this movie. She didn’t deliver anything new. All the others are simply there to fill in the gaps.

And there is a “crazy” sex scene between Artemisia and Themistocles that gave Eva a lot of bruises (during the making). I didn’t know that until I read one of the reviews. I watched it here in India where something stronger than Xerxes will make sure that it does not reach the audience, the censor board. They succeeded in editing the nudity and sex but not all that violence and blood. At least, they edited the sex part because it was the last thing I wanted to see after watching all that gory bloodshed.

The technical part was something I couldn’t sit through. Gone are the good old days, when people used practical effects. The Background score, on the other hand, composed by Junkie XL (what a name) is excellent. While watching a movie that takes place in the ancient times, that’s the one thing I look forward to. I love the theme Artemisia’s childhood.

Watch the 3D version if you have a good stomach or else you may end up unconscious or puke in your seats. But fans of Eva Green will love this movie.

2.5/5

Disclaimer: this is an updated review from author’s personal blog.

Featured image credit: creofire.com

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